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Jake Tapper just asked Bernie Sanders what he thought about violent protesters that support him:

“Some of your supporters in Chicago were acting violently as well, and I have to say — the guy who rushed the stage yesterday at Donald Trump voted for you,” said Tapper. That protestor — Tommy DiMassino of Dayton, Ohio — was caught on film abrasively rushing the stage towards Trump at an event Saturday before being subdues by Secret Service agents.

“Millions of people voted for me. If I have to take responsibility for everybody who voted for me it would be a very difficult life,” the Democratic candidate responded to a laugh from the crowd.

“I never have — and never will — condone violence,” Sanders continued.

What else is there that needs to be said? I already know the right will willingly not discern how violent Trump supporters and violent Sanders supporters are different, but if the supposedly liberal media goes along with that inability to mark distinctions, the Nazi or Soviet comparisons will never end for Sanders.

It’s simple. Sanders has never once condoned violence in his rallies, interviews, or debates. He runs on an anti-war, pro-peace platform. Trump, on the other hand, has violence built into his platforms, encourages his supporters to be violent, and threatens violence himself. He entertains the idea of actually paying the legal fees for his supporter who attacked a protester, not just saying he would in an offhand, joking manner. Sanders supporters aren’t wound up and lashing out because of what Sanders says; Trump causes both his advocates and detractors to act violently because he himself constantly invokes violence.

No, I’m not saying Donald Trump is personally responsible for the man who tried to attack him, and the attack that man tried to perpetrate is wholly unjustified. But Trump and the media shouldn’t be surprised that people are incredibly angry because of the inflammatory things he says, whether they support or oppose him. It is not, and should not be, controversial to say that Trump’s rhetoric is a large contributor to the way people act. His rhetoric is acidic, and it’s eating away at people’s better instincts.

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